Handouts from conferences, workshops, and trainings where Successful Schools, Inc. staff have presented.

APBS: 2013 Conference in San Diego, CA March 28-30, 2013

Policies & Practices for Reducing the Use of Out-of-School Suspensions:
This presentation will explore current research and provide specific examples from several school districts in Louisiana that have reduced the use of out-of-school suspension between 22%-63%. Included will be an examination of the critical features for establishing an effective and responsive school-wide behavior management plan. Case studies from schools served by the presenters will be used to illustrate the role that administrators, coaches, and school based team members play in developing, implementing, and maintaining effective SW-PBIS plans.

Several examples, including sample plans, will be available to participants that provide guidelines for creating their own proactive school-wide behavior support policies and procedures for schools they serve. Overall, this presentation will offer helping professionals models for creating inclusive schools that support success for all students.

APBS: 2012 Conference in Atlanta, GA March 15-17, 2012

School-Wide PBIS in High School: Reducing the Use of School Suspension
School districts across the country are rightfully concerned about the numbers of students who are being suspended or expelled for their behavior. Equally important is the emerging research that indicates that these consequences are not likely to change the inappropriate behavior of the students involved, nor do they serve to deter other students from engaging in the same behaviors (Skiba, Peterson & Williams, 1999, 1997). Instead, these consequences make the suspended student’s academic progress more difficult, and they may increase the likelihood of the student dropping out of school or having other negative outcomes.

This presentation provided examples from high schools in Shreveport, LA, Lake Charles, LA, Connorsville, IN and Mishawaka, IN on how positive behavior support strategies are being employed in schools serving grades 9 through 12 to create educational environments that promote; a) effective educational programming, b) socially competent behavior, c) self management skills, and d) successful transitions from middle to high school settings.

Participants were provided specific SW-PBIS practices and policies that have been effectively implemented in high schools in Indiana & Louisiana resulting in significant reductions in the use of school suspension.  Multiple examples of SW-PBIS HS plans were presented that demonstrate positive behavioral-change outcomes for students. Participants were provided a framework for reviewing and strengthening practices & policies in the schools they serve.

ESC-Region 19: Border Conference in El Paso Feb. 2-3, 2012

Reducing the Need and Use of Suspension: Effective policies and practices
School districts across the country are rightfully concerned about the numbers of students who are being suspended or expelled for their behavior. Part of this concern is heightened by the fact that there appears to be over-representation of students with special educational needs, especially students from minority backgrounds who are suspended or expelled from school (Skiba, Michael, Nardo & Peterson, 2002). Emerging research indicates that these consequences are not likely to change the inappropriate behavior of the students involved, nor do they serve to deter other students from engaging in the same behaviors (Skiba, Peterson & Williams, 1997, 1999). Instead, these consequences make the suspended student’s academic progress more difficult, and may increase the likelihood of the student dropping out of school or having other negative outcomes.

Dr. March will review specific policies he has helped develop and effective practices he has researched that have been implemented in several school districts resulting in significant reductions in the need for and use of in-school and out of school suspension. Each of the policies and practices has empirical evidence demonstrating positive behavioral-change outcomes for students, and provides educators opportunities to maintain or re-engage students in school rather than pushing them out of school.

TCASE Great Ideas Convention 2012

Reducing the Need and Use of Suspension for Students with Special Needs
School districts across the country are rightfully concerned about the numbers of students who are being suspended or expelled for their behavior. Part of this concern is heightened by the fact that there appears to be over-representation of students with special educational needs, especially students from minority backgrounds who are suspended or expelled from school (Wu, Pink, Crain & Moles, 1982; Townsend, 2000; Skiba, Michael, Nardo & Peterson, 2002). Emerging research indicates that these consequences are not likely to change the inappropriate behavior of the students involved, nor do they serve to deter other students from engaging in the same behaviors (Skiba, Peterson & Williams, 1997, 1999). Instead, these consequences make the suspended student’s academic progress more difficult, and may increase the likelihood of the student dropping out of school or having other negative outcomes.

Midwest Educational Leadership 2010 Conference: Responding to Problem Behavior

The full-day session presents current research and best practices on how to prevent and respond to problem behaviors utilizing a Positive Behavior Interventions & Support (PBIS) framework. PBIS provides a proactive model of behavior support that defines and teaches prosocial behaviors. PBIS can greatly reduce problem behavior and increase desired behaviors among all students. Moreover, a school-wide behavior program creates a school culture for meeting the needs of students who are at-risk for school failure.

Indiana Association of School Psychologists 2009 Conference:
PBIS: How to prevent & respond to problem behavior

These sessions provided current research and best practices on how to prevent and respond to problem behaviors utilizing a Positive Behavior Interventions & Support (PBIS) framework. PBIS provides a proactive model of behavior support that defines and teaches pro-social behaviors. PBIS can greatly reduce problem behavior and increase desired behaviors among all students. Moreover, a school-wide behavior program creates a school culture for meeting the needs of students who are at-risk for school failure. Participants attending this presentation learned the critical principles, features, and procedures for establishing a proactive school-wide behavior management plan and how to apply to specific settings ranging from the classroom to the cafeteria. Below are tools and materials that can be used for training on how to conduct a needs assessment and the skills for linking that information to the development, implementation, and evaluation of a school-wide positive behavior support plan. Information will be provided on school-wide (universal), classroom, at-risk students (targeted/group), and individual student (intensive) interventions.

Shinn, Phillips, March: Implementing Response to Intervention (RTI) in a Problem-Solving Model at the Secondary Level (NASP 2008)

OTHER RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO THE RIGHT OF THE SCREEN